Each day businesses call upon a business analyst to determine what must be done in order to accomplish a certain task. Each avenue must be explored and analyzed for a project proposal to be implemented. The project scope determines what the course of action may or may not be. Each person involved must answer to another until management is satisfied all has been done to rectify the situation. Everything stays on task. The project as a whole is coming together. Teams are co-ordinating with each other to apply the objective into the code. It is all going according to plan. At the end, it all falls apart. Nothing is as it seems. The project has failed to accomplish what it set out to do. The business analyst is hung out to dry. Every finger points to him or her. In actuality it is not the fault of the analyst.

It was a joint effort from the beginning. When the problem was recognized as such and something needed to be done is when the business analyst came into the scope of things. Management said get it done. IT said it is done. Low end said it just isn’t what we need anymore. So what happened? The first thing is failing to disclose all information necessary do make a proper assessment of the situation.

A business analyst is not a mushroom. You can not keep them in the dark. They have to know the in’s and out’s of the company. He or she must be aware of the company vision or end goal. A few facts and figures just will not do the job. Disclosure can close the project tighter than a drum.

Acting as the liaison between departments and upper management, the business analyst must gather data from everyone involved in the project. When someone feels they do not want to be a team player this can cause a disruption in the scheme of things. Each team was delegated a task. Upstarts who think they know what is the end result and rush to meet the goal, may find themselves dead wrong. However there are times when up and com