Getting A Gastric Bypass: Desperate Times Call For Desperate Measures

Why get a gastric bypass? It sometimes goes like this: you’ve been looking at yourself in the mirror and are looking at all the flab on you? Have you been laying awake all night as you remember your physical difficulties during the day? Life isn’t exactly when you’re overweight and a lot of people try to rid themselves of the fat on their body. The problem is sometimes alll those exercise programs and diets don’t exactly work out for those doing them. What do you do when your weight yo-yos up and down or, worse, it just won’t go down?

Well, that’s the time when you think about getting a surgical option. Liposuctions are a good stopgap option and they can often do the trick – all it takes is a good push and maintaining weight is a lot easier. However, sometimes even that is not enough. The fat keeps on coming back, whether it’s just a genetic predesposition to it or something similar. Some people really need help to get them out of obesity’s tight embrace. That’s where a gastric bypass comes in.

A gastric bypass, or as medical professionals call it a “Roux-en-Y gastric bypass”, is a surgical weight-loss procedure that enables the patient to lose weight on a constant and regular basis. It is one of the more safe options and is because of this the preferred option when any weight-loss surgery is being considered. What it does is essentially make a small pouch in the upper part of the stomach, and connect it directly to the middle of your small intestine. This severely cuts down on your caloric intake by skipping most of the intestinal tract and also reduces your appetite by making your stomach handle less food.

The procedure may sound like an easy thing but a gastric bypass is still a major surgical operation and has its own risks. You’ll be under general anesthesia for this operation and tubes will be inserted via your nose and your abdomen to make sure you recover completely after the operation. The operation itself will only take a few hours.

It may even be shorter if you under go a laparoscopic bypass, a procedure which uses a laparoscope instead of opening your abdomen completely for the operation. This results in less infection and accelerates healing time. After the operation, your doctor will probably keep you in the hospital for three to five days for observation.

Of course, immediately after the operation you will be experiencing a few changes. First of all, in the first three days after the bypass, you’ll be on an IV drip – no eating until your stomach heals. Then it’s twelve weeks of reginemnted diet as you progress to solid foods again. You’ll also be feeling the effects of the gastric bypass. When you eat a lot of food or eat quickly, it may cause you to vomit or pain. You will feel yourself losing weight in the next few months but will also have to suffer the side-effects like weakness, hair loss and body aches.

This is why you should never undertake a gastric bypass unless it’s truly necessary.

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